No Man’s Orchard

Introduction

No Man’s Orchard

No Man’s Orchard is one of only a handful of traditional orchards remaining in the Stour Valley. It retains the large trees so valuable to birds, insects and lichen. 

Key habitats:

Traditional orchard

Ownership/Management:

Chartham Hatch and Harbledown Parish Councils

Size:

4 ha

Designations:

Local Wildlife Site, Local Nature Reserve

Facilities available at this site

  • Interpretation Panels

About the Site

There are now far fewer orchards in Kent than there used to be, when the county really was ‘the garden of England’. What is more, the orchards remaining have changed a great deal, the large, old trees being replaced with modern dwarf varieties that make harvesting easier.No Man’s Orchard is one of only a handful of traditional orchards remaining in the Stour Valley. It retains the large trees so valuable to birds, insects and lichen. 

Blossom, windfall fruit and wild flowers among the grassland also attract wildlife, which visitors can look out for from the comfort of the sculptural seating. With their traditional fruit tree varieties and special place in local culture and landscapes, old orchards like this should be conserved as living examples of farming history, but are often difficult to protect. Fortunately, this orchard has been purchased by two parish councils and is being carefully managed as a place for the community to enjoy.

Visiting

By car

From the A28, take Howfield Lane and drive into Chartham Hatch village. There is limited on-street parking in the village (please consider residents). Please do not park at the village hall as it is in constant use. Walk down Bigbury Road, then follow the sign for the North Downs Way through the playing field, through the woods and into the orchard.

By train

Nearest rail station – Chartham (1.5 miles)

By bus 

Route number 667 comes into Chartham Hatch.

Transport Links to this site

  • Train
  • Bus

No Man’s Orchard Photo Gallery

Click images to view larger